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Alexander Revisited:The (Unrated) Final Cut


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LES MISERABLES MOVIE POSTER 2 Sided ORIGINAL FINAL 27×40 ANNE HATHAWAY


This is a BRAND NEW/UNUSED Near Mint/Mint condition Double Sided ORIGINAL FINAL US 1 sheet poster for the movie LES MISERABLES. The poster measures 27 x 40 and its a guaranteed Original poster. The item will be rolled in a poly tubing and shipped inside a .125 thick sturdy tube with bubble wrap protection and end caps

Product Features

  • This is an Original Poster issued by the studio
  • It measures 27×40 inches
  • It is Double Sided
  • This poster is a great collectors item

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Alexander Revisited:The (Unrated) Final Cut


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Man vs Wild – Season 6 [Final Season] [NON-USA Format / Region 4 Import – Australia]


After five seasons of being dropped off in remote locales around the globe, survival expert and extreme adventurer Bear Grylls finds new extreme destinations and faces more challenges, sharing invaluable survival strategies along the way. In addition to a special episode which features unseen footage of Bear providing viewers with his ultimate survival guide, the sixth season presents Bear with obstacles that push him to his limits in the wilderness.

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Lost: Season 6 – Final Season


Follow the epic twists and turns of LOST as it is time for our characters to finally learn their ultimate destiny in LOST, The Final Season.Lost‘s sixth and final season drew both raves and criticism from its passionate fans who wanted answers to the series’ many loose ends. Executive producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse found a way to wrap up some lingering story lines while introducing entirely new ones when they decided to employ a “flash-sideways” plot device, showing us an alternate reality in which Oceanic 815 never crashes (a consequence of the hydrogen-bomb detonation that occurred in season 5’s finale). This method allowed some long-gone characters to return (Boone, Charlie, Libby) and even showed sunnier outcomes for some of the survivors’ more unhappy pasts (Locke, Hurley). But in the non-Sideways world, the bomb’s detonation doesn’t change their course, and the survivors find themselves delving deeper into the island’s mythology–notably, the yin/yang of the demigod Jacob (Mark Pellegrino) and the smoke monster, a.k.a. the Man in Black (Titus Welliver), as well as some curious denizens of a temple (a subplot that doesn’t add much to driving the story forward). As the smoke monster’s scheme to escape the island leaves a trail of carnage, culminating in a face-off with that other villain Charles Widmore (Alan Dale), some primary characters meet their end in season 6 while others find the redemption they’d been seeking since the series began. Moreover, some survivors finally find out their connection to the island (and each other) when the two realities start to intermingle, leading to a tearful finale that satisfies and frustrates at the same time (though when it comes to Lost, what else is new?).

While each cast member is on their “A” game, the final episodes really belong to Matthew Fox, who received his first Emmy® nomination for this season. Nestor Carbonell is also a standout in “Ab Aeterno,” an episode that finally explains the ageless Richard Alpert. In addition, a few small details are wrapped up in a bonus short, “The New Man in Charge,” which serves as an epilogue. Other special features include “The End: Crafting a Final Season,” which interviews legendary TV producers such as James Burrows (Cheers, Friends) on the pressures of wrapping up a series. It also shows the finale script being printed out on red paper (so it can’t be copied) and delivered to a specially built locked mailbox outside Jorge Garcia’s home. Garcia, who plays Hurley, is then seen reading the script for the first time and weeping. “See You in Another Life, Brotha” goes deeper into the flash-sideways storytelling; “Lost on Location” highlights behind-the-scenes action behind specific episodes; the always-hilarious “Lost in 8:15″ wraps up the entire series (only through season 5) in eight minutes and 15 seconds; and “A Hero’s Journey” is a ho-hum set of interviews examining the heroic arcs of several major characters. Bloopers and deleted scenes round out the bonus features. But with all the lingering questions in the series, it’s a shame Lindelof and Cuse didn’t add commentary to more than a handful of episodes, because this is one DVD set that sure could’ve used it (not having any commentary on the finale is near unforgivable). You do, however, learn that the black-and-white stones game played by Jacob and the Man in Black is actually called Senate (hey, you gotta take what you can get). So long, Lost; it’s been one hell of a journey. —Ellen A. Kim

Product Features

  • TV
  • Run Time: 714
  • Release Date: 12/24/2011

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Alexander, Revisited: The Final Cut (Two-Disc Special Edition)


Alexander Revisited: (Unrated) Final Cut, The (Dbl DVD)For better or worse (and in this case, it’s mostly for better), Oliver Stone’s Alexander Revisited should stand as the definitive version of Stone’s much-maligned epic about the great Asian conqueror. Following the DVD release of his previous Director’s Cut, Stone offers a video introduction here, explaining why he felt a third and final attempt at refining his film was necessary. Essentially, he’s using this opportunity to re-create the “road show” format of the Biblical epics of the 1950s and ’60s, with a three-and-a-half-hour running time (with an intermission at the two-hour mark) including 45 minutes of previously unseen footage. Stone has also significantly restructured the film, resulting in substantial (if not exactly redemptive) improvements in its narrative flow. Alexander (played in a torrent of emotions by Colin Farrell) is dying as the film opens, his final moments serving to bookend the film’s epic story, which incorporates flashback sequences to flesh out the Macedonian king’s back-story involving the turbulent battle of fate between his father, King Philip (Val Kilmer) and his scheming sorceress mother Olympia (Angelina Jolie, ridiculous accent and all), who insists that Alexander is literally a child of the gods.

In Stone’s final cut, epic battles remain chaotic (although Alexander’s strategy is somewhat easier to follow, with on-screen titles indicating left, right, and center during his army’s greatest maneuvers) and the ultra-violent battles are more graphically gory than ever (hence their “unrated” status). The animalistic lovemaking of Alexander and his barbarian bride Roxana (Rosario Dawson) is slightly extended (with Dawson as ravishing as ever), and Stone’s additional footage also improves the overall arc of Alexander’s relationship with his closest generals and male companions, although his most intimate homosexual encounters remain mostly discreet. As Alexander Revisited makes clear, the film’s weaknesses remain unavoidable, but Stone deserves credit for recognizing how a longer running time, and more disciplined narrative structure, would bring Alexander closer to the respect it never earned from critics and filmgoers alike. This is unquestionably a better film than it used to be, leaving us to wonder why it took three separate efforts to shape Alexander into its best possible presentation. –Jeff Shannon

Product Features

  • Factory sealed DVD

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Mockingjay (The Final Book of The Hunger Games)


The third book in Suzanne Collins’s phenomenal and worldwide bestselling Hunger Games trilogy is now available in paperback.

“My name is Katniss Everdeen. Why am I not dead? I should be dead.”

Katniss Everdeen, girl on fire, has survived, even though her home has been destroyed. There are rebels. There are new leaders. A revolution is unfolding.

District 13 has come out of the shadows and is plotting to overthrow the Capitol. Though she’s long been a part of the revolution, Katniss hasn’t known it. Now it seems that everyone has had a hand in the carefully laid plans but her.

The success of the rebellion hinges on Katniss’s willingness to be a pawn, to accept responsibility for countless lives, and to change the course of the future of Panem. To do this, she must put aside her feelings of anger and distrust. She must become the rebels’ Mockingjay – no matter what the cost.

Product Description
Against all odds, Katniss Everdeen has survived the Hunger Games twice. But now that she’s made it out of the bloody arena alive, she’s still not safe. The Capitol is angry. The Capitol wants revenge. Who do they think should pay for the unrest? Katniss. And what’s worse, President Snow has made it clear that no one else is safe either. Not Katniss’s family, not her friends, not the people of District 12. Powerful and haunting, this thrilling final installment of Suzanne Collins’s groundbreaking The Hunger Games trilogy promises to be one of the most talked about books of the year.


A Q&A with Suzanne Collins, Author of Mockingjay (The Final Book of The Hunger Games)

Q: You have said from the start that The Hunger Games story was intended as a trilogy. Did it actually end the way you planned it from the beginning?

A: Very much so. While I didn’t know every detail, of course, the arc of the story from gladiator game, to revolution, to war, to the eventual outcome remained constant throughout the writing process.

Q: We understand you worked on the initial screenplay for a film to be based on The Hunger Games. What is the biggest difference between writing a novel and writing a screenplay?

A: There were several significant differences. Time, for starters. When you’re adapting a novel into a two-hour movie you can’t take everything with you. The story has to be condensed to fit the new form. Then there’s the question of how best to take a book told in the first person and present tense and transform it into a satisfying dramatic experience. In the novel, you never leave Katniss for a second and are privy to all of her thoughts so you need a way to dramatize her inner world and to make it possible for other characters to exist outside of her company. Finally, there’s the challenge of how to present the violence while still maintaining a PG-13 rating so that your core audience can view it. A lot of things are acceptable on a page that wouldn’t be on a screen. But how certain moments are depicted will ultimately be in the director’s hands.

Q: Are you able to consider future projects while working on The Hunger Games, or are you immersed in the world you are currently creating so fully that it is too difficult to think about new ideas?

A: I have a few seeds of ideas floating around in my head but–given that much of my focus is still on The Hunger Games–it will probably be awhile before one fully emerges and I can begin to develop it.

Q: The Hunger Games is an annual televised event in which one boy and one girl from each of the twelve districts is forced to participate in a fight-to-the-death on live TV. What do you think the appeal of reality television is–to both kids and adults?

A: Well, they’re often set up as games and, like sporting events, there’s an interest in seeing who wins. The contestants are usually unknown, which makes them relatable. Sometimes they have very talented people performing. Then there’s the voyeuristic thrill—watching people being humiliated, or brought to tears, or suffering physically–which I find very disturbing. There’s also the potential for desensitizing the audience, so that when they see real tragedy playing out on, say, the news, it doesn’t have the impact it should.

Q: If you were forced to compete in the Hunger Games, what do you think your special skill would be?

A: Hiding. I’d be scaling those trees like Katniss and Rue. Since I was trained in sword-fighting, I guess my best hope would be to get hold of a rapier if there was one available. But the truth is I’d probably get about a four in Training.

Q: What do you hope readers will come away with when they read The Hunger Games trilogy?

A: Questions about how elements of the books might be relevant in their own lives. And, if they’re disturbing, what they might do about them.

Q: What were some of your favorite novels when you were a teen?

A: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
Boris by Jaapter Haar
Germinal by Emile Zola
Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury

(Photo © Cap Pryor)


Product Features

  • Used Book in Good Condition

For MORE INFORMATION please click here!

Alexander Revisited: The Final Cut [Blu-ray]


Now available is an all new and completely unrated version of Oliver Stone’s incredible epic film, loaded with nearly 40 minutes of additional never-before-seen footage, that takes the film to a new level of realism and intensity. Restructured and expanded into two acts with one intermission, Oliver Stone’s vision is delivered the way he originally conceived and intended. With the new, unrated and graphic battle scenes and unadulterated sensuality, it’s the movie you couldn’t see in theatres, now available on DVD for the very first time!

DVD Features:
Introduction
Theatrical Trailer

For better or worse (and in this case, it’s mostly for better), Oliver Stone’s Alexander Revisited should stand as the definitive version of Stone’s much-maligned epic about the great Asian conqueror. Following the DVD release of his previous Director’s Cut, Stone offers a video introduction here, explaining why he felt a third and final attempt at refining his film was necessary. Essentially, he’s using this opportunity to re-create the “road show” format of the Biblical epics of the 1950s and ’60s, with a three-and-a-half-hour running time (with an intermission at the two-hour mark) including 45 minutes of previously unseen footage. Stone has also significantly restructured the film, resulting in substantial (if not exactly redemptive) improvements in its narrative flow. Alexander (played in a torrent of emotions by Colin Farrell) is dying as the film opens, his final moments serving to bookend the film’s epic story, which incorporates flashback sequences to flesh out the Macedonian king’s back-story involving the turbulent battle of fate between his father, King Philip (Val Kilmer) and his scheming sorceress mother Olympia (Angelina Jolie, ridiculous accent and all), who insists that Alexander is literally a child of the gods.

In Stone’s final cut, epic battles remain chaotic (although Alexander’s strategy is somewhat easier to follow, with on-screen titles indicating left, right, and center during his army’s greatest maneuvers) and the ultra-violent battles are more graphically gory than ever (hence their “unrated” status). The animalistic lovemaking of Alexander and his barbarian bride Roxana (Rosario Dawson) is slightly extended (with Dawson as ravishing as ever), and Stone’s additional footage also improves the overall arc of Alexander’s relationship with his closest generals and male companions, although his most intimate homosexual encounters remain mostly discreet. As Alexander Revisited makes clear, the film’s weaknesses remain unavoidable, but Stone deserves credit for recognizing how a longer running time, and more disciplined narrative structure, would bring Alexander closer to the respect it never earned from critics and filmgoers alike. This is unquestionably a better film than it used to be, leaving us to wonder why it took three separate efforts to shape Alexander into its best possible presentation. –Jeff Shannon

Product Features

  • Now available is an all new and completely unrated version of Oliver Stone’s incredible epic film, loaded with nearly 40 minutes of additional never-before-seen footage, that takes the film to a new level of realism and intensity. Restructured and expanded into two acts with one intermission, Oliver Stone’s vision is delivered the way he originally conceived and intended. With the new, unrated and

For MORE INFORMATION please click here!