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Breakdown: Limited Edition


Strictly Limited to 20, 000 Copies this Digipak Format features Three Tracks and Enhanced Tracks featuring Exclusive Behind the Scenes Footage, Web Site Link, Photo’s, Lyrics and a Screen Saver.”There’s a place that we must go: into the soul, into the heart, into the dark” sings Melissa Etheridge in “Into the Dark”; it might serve as the refrain for the entire album, her first since 1995’s Your Little Secret. In Breakdown, the singer-songwriter returns to the studio recharged and with a newfound confessional maturity that is at once vulnerable and searingly direct. Despite her phenomenal successes, Etheridge confronts the insecurities of obsessive desire (“Angels Would Fall,” with its intricate overlay of religious imagery, touches a new level compared to the savage rawness of her classic “Like the Way I Do”), a bitter breakup (“Stronger than Me”), and an adolescent’s confused sexual identity (“Mama I’m Strange”). This journey into the heart of darkness comprises not only sharp-edged self-reflection but also the painful vision of “Scarecrow,” a drum & bass-anchored lament for gay murder victim Matthew Shepard. There’s a therapeutic sense of catharsis throughout that makes the serenity of “My Lover” and “Sleep” seem like a hard-earned conclusion. With her vocals steely, acid-washed, and forthright as ever, Etheridge and coproducer/lead guitarist John Shanks concoct a rich and tightly webbed acoustic-and-amplified soundscape. Several of the songs have a sameness of tone, but Etheridge’s passion never sounds fake, whether in the guitar-charged chorus of the title track or “Enough of Me”‘s gently rising chords. And in its total effect, Etheridge’s Breakdown sounds a lot more like a breakthrough to still a higher level. This limited-edition version of the album includes three tracks not found on the standard-issue version of Breakdown. –Tom May

Product Features

  • Melissa Etheridge- Breakdown

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Trends International Star Wars IV One sheet Collector’s Edition Wall Poster 24″ x 36″


Everyone has a favorite movie, TV show, band or sports team. Whether you love an actor, character or Singer or player, our posters run the gamut — from cult classics to new releases, superheroes to Divas, wise cracking cartoons to Wrestlers, sports teams to player phenomes. Trends has them all.

Product Features

  • 22. 375″ x 34″ Wall Poster
  • Officially Licensed
  • High-Quality Crystal-Clear Image
  • Printed on Standard Poster Paper
  • Ready to Frame

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Alfred’s Group Piano for Adults: Student Book 2, 2nd Edition (Book & CD-ROM)


The Second Edition of Alfred’s Group Piano for Adults, Book 2 includes updates inspired by numerous recommendations from group piano teachers and students. This book includes a CD-ROM containing both Audio and General MIDI Files of the 500+ accompaniments included in the text, each with an interesting and engaging arrangement coupled with the piano part. Designed for collegiate non-keyboard music majors with little or no keyboard experience, the easy-to-use text contains 26 units, each intended to be covered in one week, thus fulfilling two semesters or three quarters of study. Theory, technique, sight-reading, repertoire, harmonization, improvisation, and ensemble activities are taught thoroughly and consistently throughout the text. The comb binding creates a lay-flat book that is perfect for study and performance. Book 2 is 408 pages.

Product Features

  • .

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Teen Female Heroes Book To Movie Pack: The Hunger Games (2Dvd/ Digital) , The Hunger Games Mockingjay Part 1(Dvd/ Digital), Divergent (Dvd/ Digital), Twilight (2 Disc Edition), The Maze Runner


Teen Hero/ Antihero Mega Pack

Twilight (Two Disc Special Edition)

Divergent

The Maze Runner

The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games Mockingjay Part 1

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The Giver Movie Tie-In Edition (1) (Giver Quartet)


The Giver, the 1994 Newbery Medal winner, has become one of the most influential novels of our time. The haunting story centers on twelve-year-old Jonas, who lives in a seemingly ideal, if colorless, world of conformity and contentment. Not until he is given his life assignment as the Receiver of Memory does he begin to understand the dark, complex secrets behind his fragile community. This movie tie-in edition features cover art from the movie and exclusive Q&A with members of the cast, including Taylor Swift, Brenton Thwaites and Cameron Monaghan.

Product Features

  • Harcourt Brace and Company

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Influencer: The New Science of Leading Change, Second Edition


An INFLUENCER leads change.
An INFLUENCER replaces bad behaviors with powerful new skills.
An INFLUENCER makes things happen.
This is what it takes to be an INFLUENCER.


Whether you’re a CEO, a parent, or merely a person who wants to make a difference, you probably wish you had more influence with the people in your life. But most of us stop trying to make change happen because we believe it is too difficult, if not impossible. We learn to cope rather than learning to influence.

From the bestselling authors who taught the world how to have Crucial Conversations comes the new edition of Influencer, a thought-provoking book that combines the remarkable insights of behavioral scientists and business leaders with the astonishing stories of high-powered influencers from all walks of life. You’ll be taught each and every step of the influence process–including robust strategies for making change inevitable in your personal life, your business, and your world. You’ll learn how to:

  • Identify high-leverage behaviors that lead to rapid and profound change
  • Apply strategies for changing both thoughts and actions
  • Marshal six sources of influence to make change inevitable

Influencer takes you on a fascinating journey from San Francisco to Thailand to South Africa, where you’ll see how seemingly “insignificant” people are making incredibly significant improvements in solving problems others would think impossible. You’ll learn how savvy folks make change not only achievable and sustainable, but inevitable. You’ll discover breakthrough ways of changing the key behaviors that lead to greater safety, productivity, quality, and customer service.

No matter who you are or what you do, you’ll never learn a more valuable or important set of principles and skills. Once you tap into the power of influence, you can reach out and help others work smarter, grow faster, live, look, and feel better–and even save lives. The sky is the limit . . . for an Influencer.

Product Features

  • McGraw-Hill

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The Film Encyclopedia 7th Edition: The Complete Guide to Film and the Film Industry


“The best movie reference book, hands down” (Newsweek) is now available in a deftly revised and meticulously updated seventh edition. Ephraim Katz’s celebrated and comprehensive cinema Bible, The Film Encyclopedia, has been lovingly expanded to include new, thorough coverage of independent films, the artistic and technical aspects of filmmaking, and the trends that lie close to the heart of today’s movie buff. Cinephiles will delight in new entries ranging from Sophia Coppola and Wes Anderson to The Lord of the Rings and Captain America. Built upon a foundation which inspired Katherine Hepburn to comment, “Wow! What a book!,” The Film Encyclopedia 7e is an indispensable addition to any movie fan’s home library.

Product Features

  • Collins Reference

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Les Miserables (Broadway) Poster Movie 18×27 Patrick A’Hearn Cindy Benson Jane Bodle David Bryant Print Limited Edition Print Frameless Art Gift


All of our posters are custom prints from commercial grade printers with THICK HIGH GLOSS PHOTO PAPER and PREMIUM INK for highest picture quality, maximum quality, suitable for a wide range of venues, and they all look great with or without frames.Our posters are a great way to enhance any room-from a dorm room to a boardroom. decorating any wall easy.

Product Features

  • High Quality Poster Print
  • Perfect for your home, office, or a gift
  • A great gift for any fan of the show.
  • This is a Certified Print with Holographic Sequential Numbering for Authenticity.
  • This poster is a true MasterPrint. A MasterPrint is a super high resolution print taken directly from the original MasterFile.

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Santa Claus: The Movie (25th Anniversary Edition) [Blu-ray]


This is the story of a master toymaker who discovers a magical kingdom of elves at the North Pole. He is entrusted with special powers to become Santa Claus! He meets Patch (Dudley Moore), an eager-to-please elf who becomes mixed up with a dastardly toy tycoon’s (John Lithgow) plans to take over Christmas.

Product Features

  • Factory sealed DVD

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ATL (Widescreen Edition) by Warner Home Video by Chris Robinson (II)


ATL (WIDESCREEN EDITION) MOVIE

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James Bond Ultimate Edition Boxed Sets Bundle


Vol. 1 (The Man with the Golden Gun / Goldfinger / The World Is Not Enough / Diamonds Are Forever / The Living Daylights) Vol. 2 (A View to a Kill / Thunderball / Die Another Day / The Spy Who Loved Me / Licence to Kill) Vol. 3 (GoldenEye / Live and Let Die / For Your Eyes Only / From Russia With Love / On Her Majesty’s Secret Service) Vol. 4 (Dr. No / You Only Live Twice / Octopussy / Tomorrow Never Dies / Moonraker) The Man with the Golden Gun: The British superspy with a license to kill takes on his dark underworld double, a classy assassin who kills with golden bullets at $1 million a hit. Roger Moore, in his second outing as James Bond, meets Christopher Lee’s Scaramanga, one of the most magnetic villains in the entire series, in this entertaining but rather wan entry in the 007 sweepstakes. Moore balances the overplayed humor of the film with a steely performance and Lee’s charm and enthusiasm makes Scaramanga a cool, deadly, and thoroughly enchanting adversary. —Sean Axmaker

Goldfinger: To own Goldfinger (1964) on DVD is to have at your fingertips the proof that Sean Connery is the definitive James Bond. No one but Connery can believably seduce women so effortlessly, kill with almost as much ease, and then pull another bottle of Dom Perignon ’53 out of the fridge. Goldfinger contains many of the most memorable scenes in the Bond series: gorgeous Shirley Eaton (as Jill Masterson) coated in gold paint by evil Auric Goldfinger and deposited in Bond’s bed; silent Oddjob, flipping a razor-sharp derby like a Frisbee to sever heads; our hero spread-eagle on a table while a laser beam moves threateningly toward his crotch. Goldfinger’s two climaxes, inside Fort Knox and aboard a private plane, have to be seen to be believed. —Raphael Shargel

The World Is Not Enough:Bond 5.0, Pierce Brosnan, undercuts his usually suave persona with a darker, more brutal edge largely absent since Sean Connery departed. Equally tantalizing are our initial glimpses of Bond’s nemesis du jour, Renard (Robert Carlyle), and imminent love interest, Elektra King (Sophie Marceau), both atypically complex characters cast with seemingly shrewd choices, and directed by the capable Michael Apted. The story’s focus on post-Soviet geopolitics likewise starts off on a savvy note, before being overtaken by increasingly Byzantine plot twists, hidden motives, and reversals of loyalty superheated by relentless (if intermittently perfunctory) action sequences.–Sam Sutherland

Diamonds Are Forever: Sean Connery retired from the 007 franchise after You Only Live Twice but was lured back for one last official appearance as James Bond in Diamonds Are Forever. Goldfinger director Guy Hamilton keeps the film zipping along gamely from one entertaining set piece to another, including a terrific car chase in a parking lot, a battle with a pair of bikini-clad killer gymnasts named Bambi and Thumper, and a deadly game with a bizarre pair of fey, sardonic killers who dispatch their victims with elaborate invention. Connery retired again after this one but he returned once more, for Never Say Never Again 15 years later. —Sean Axmaker

The Living Daylights: Timothy Dalton made his 007 debut in the lean, mean mode of Sean Connery, doing away with the pun-filled camp of Roger Moore’s final outings. This James Bond is ruthless, tough, and romantic. The Living Daylights, set during the thaw of the cold war, begins with the defection of Russian KGB General Koskov (Jeroen Krabb) and his revelation of a Soviet plot to eliminate Britain’s secret agent force. Assigned to eliminate Koskov’s Soviet boss (John Rhys-Davies), Bond uncovers a conspiracy involving Koskov and an American arms dealer (Joe Don Baker). Veteran series director John Glen’s action scenes have never been better–especially the show-stopping mid-air battle on the net of a speeding cargo plane–and he returns the series to the smart, rough, high-energy adventures that made the Bond reputation. —Sean Axmaker

A View to a Kill: Roger Moore’s last outing as James Bond is evidence enough that it was time to pass the torch to another actor. Beset by crummy action (an out-of-control fire engine?) and featuring a fading Moore still trying to prop up his mannered idea of style, the film is largely interesting for Christopher Walken’s quirky performance as a sort-of supervillain who wants to take out California’s Silicon Valley. Grace Jones has a spookily interesting presence as a lethal associate of Walken’s (and who, in the best Bond tradition, has sex with 007 before trying to kill him later), and Patrick Macnee (Steed!) has a warm if brief bit. Even directed by John Glen, who brought some crackle to the Moore years in the Bond franchise, this is a very slight effort. — Tom Keogh

Thunderball: James Bond’s fourth adventure takes him to the Bahamas, where a NATO warplane with a nuclear payload has disappeared into the sea. Bond (Sean Connery) travels from a tiny health spa (where he tangles with a mechanized masseuse run amuck) to the casinos of Nassau and soon picks up the trail of SPECTRE’s number-two man, Emilio Largo (Adolfo Celi), and his beautiful mistress, Domino (Claudine Auger), whom Bond soon seduces to his side. Equipped with more gadgets than ever, 007 escapes an ambush with a personal-size jet pack and takes to the water as he searches for the undersea plane, battles Largo’s pet sharks, and finally leads the battle against Largo’s scuba-equipped henchmen in a spectacular underwater climax. This thrilling Bond entry became Connery’s most successful outing in the series and was remade in 1983 as Never Say Never Again, with Connery returning to the role after a 12-year hiatus. —Sean Axmaker

Die Another Day: The 20th James Bond adventure, Die Another Day succeeds on three important fronts: it avoids comparison to Austin Powers by keeping its cheesy humor in check, allows Halle Berry to be sexy and worthy of a spinoff franchise, and keeps pace with the technical wizardry that modern action films demand. Pierce Brosnan is paired with American agent Jinx (Berry) in chasing a genetically altered North Korean villain (Rick Yune) armed with a satellite capable of destroying just about anything. John Cleese and Judi Dench reprise their recurring roles (as “Q” and “M,” respectively); they’re accompanied by weapons-laden sports cars, a hokey cameo by Madonna (who sings the techno-pulsed theme song), and enough double-entendres to keep Bond-philes adequately shaken and stirred. Die Another Day makes you welcome the familiar end-credits promise: James Bond will return. —Jeff Shannon

The Spy Who Loved Me: The best of the James Bond adventures starring Roger Moore as tuxedoed Agent 007, this globe-trotting thriller introduced the steel-toothed Jaws (played by seven-foot-two-inch-tall actor Richard Kiel) as one of the most memorable and indestructible Bond villains. Jaws is so tenacious, in fact, that Moore looks genuinely frightened, and that adds to the abundant fun. This time Bond teams up with yet another lovely Russian agent (Barbara Bach) to track a pair of nuclear submarines that the nefarious Stromberg (Curt Jürgens) plans to use in his plot to start World War III. The Spy Who Loved Me is a galaxy away from the suave Sean Connery exploits of the 1960s, but the film works perfectly as grandiose entertainment. From cavernous undersea lairs to the vast horizons of Egypt, this Bond thriller keeps its tongue firmly in cheek with a plot tailor-made for daredevil escapism. —Jeff Shannon

License to Kill: Timothy Dalton’s second and last shot at playing James Bond isn’t nearly as much fun as his debut, two years earlier, in the 1987 The Living Daylights. This time Bond gets mad after a close friend (David Hedison) from the intelligence sector is assassinated on his wedding day, and 007 goes undercover to link the murder to an international drug cartel. Robert Davi makes an interesting adversary, but as with most of the Bond films in the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s–and especially since the end of the cold war–one has to wonder why we should still care about these lesser villains and their unimaginative crimes. Still, Dalton did manage in his short time with the character to make 007 his own, which neither Roger Moore did nor Pierce Brosnan did. —Tom Keogh

Goldeneye: The 18th James Bond adventure was a runaway box-office success when released in 1995, thanks to the arrival of Pierce Brosnan as the fifth actor (following the departure of Timothy Dalton) to play the suave, danger-loving Agent 007. This James Bond is a bit more vulnerable and psychologically complex–and just a shade more politically correct–but he’s still a formally attired playboy at heart, with a lovely Russian beauty (Izabella Scorupco) as his sexy ally against a cadre of renegade Russians bent on–what else?–global domination. All in all, this action-packed Bond adventure provided a much-needed boost the long-running movie series, revitalizing the 007 franchise for the turn of the millennium. —Jeff Shannon

Live and Let Die: Roger Moore was introduced as James Bond in this 1973 action movie featuring secret agent 007. This film marks a deviation from the more character-driven stories of the Connery years, a deliberate shift to plastic action (multiple chases, bravura stunts) that made the franchise more of a comic book or machine. If that’s not depressing enough, there’s even a good British director on board, Guy Hamilton (Force 10 from Navarone). The story finds Bond taking on an international drug dealer (Yaphet Kotto), and while that may be superficially relevant, it isn’t exactly the same as fighting supervillains on the order of Goldfinger. —Tom Keogh

For Your Eyes Only: After a ship sunk off the coast of Albania, the world’s superpowers begin a feverish search for its valuable lost cargo: the powerful ATAC system, which will give its bearer unlimited control over Polaris nuclear submarines. As Bond joins the search, he suspects the suave Kristatos (Julian Glover) of seizing the device. The competition between nations grows more deadly by the moment, but Bond finds an ally in the beautiful Melina Havelock (Caroline Bouquet), who blames Kristatos for the death of her parents. The non-stop action includes automobile chases, thrilling underwater battles, and even a breathtaking tour over razor-sharp coral reefs. But all of this is merely a prelude to 007’s cliffhanging assault of a magnificent mountaintop fortress. — Robert Lynch

From Russia with Love: Directed with consummate skill by Terence Young, the second James Bond spy thriller is considered by many fans to be the best of them all. Certainly Sean Connery was never better as the dashing Agent 007, whose latest mission takes him to Istanbul to retrieve a top-secret Russian decoding machine. His efforts are thwarted when he gets romantically distracted by a sexy Russian double agent (Daniela Bianchi), and is tracked by a lovely assassin (Lotte Lenya) with switchblade shoes, and by a crazed killer (Robert Shaw), who clashes with Bond during the film’s dazzling climax aboard the Orient Express. From Russia with Love is classic James Bond, before the gadgets, pyrotechnics, and Roger Moore steered the movies away from the more realistic tone of the books by Ian Fleming. —Jeff Shannon

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service: Australian model George Lazenby took up the mantle of the world’s most suave secret agent when Sean Connery retired as James Bond (although Connery returned in Diamonds Are Forever before leaving the role to Roger Moore). In On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 007 leaves the Service to privately pursue his SPECTRE nemesis Blofeld (played this time by Telly Savalas), whose latest master plan involves a threat to the world’s crops by agricultural sterilization. Lazenby hasn’t the intensity of Connery but he has fun with his quips and even lampoons the Bond image in a playful pre-credits sequence. Former editor Peter Hunt makes a strong directorial debut, deftly handling the elaborate action sequences with a kinetic finesse. —Sean Axmaker

Dr. No: Released in 1962, this first James Bond movie remains one of the best, and serves as an entertaining reminder that the Bond series began (in keeping with Ian Fleming’s novels) with a surprising lack of gadgetry and big-budget fireworks. In his first adventure James Bond is called to Jamaica where a colleague and secretary have been mysteriously killed. With an American CIA agent (Jack Lord, pre-Hawaii Five-O), they discover that the nefarious Dr. No (Joseph Wiseman) is scheming to blackmail the U.S. government with a device capable of deflecting and destroying U.S. rockets launched from Cape Canaveral. Of course, Bond takes time off from his exploits to enjoy the company of a few gorgeous women, including the bikini-clad Ursula Andress. This is Bond at his purest, kicking off a series of movies that shows no sign of slowing down. —Jeff Shannon

You Only Live Twice: The film boasts the best of the Bond title songs (this one sung on a dreamy track by Nancy Sinatra), but the movie itself is one of the weaker ones of the Sean Connery phase of the 007 franchise. The story concerns an effort by the evil organization SPECTRE to start a world war, but the not-so-super villain behind the plot is the awfully civilized Donald Pleasence. The thin script is by Roald Dahl (shouldn’t we have expected a better Bond nemesis from the creator of mad genius Willy Wonka?), and direction is by British veteran Lewis Gilbert (Alfie). But the movie can’t hold a candle to Dr. No, From Russia with Love, or Goldfinger. —Tom Keogh

Octopussy: Roger Moore was nearing the end of his reign as James Bond when he made Octopussy, and he looks a little worn out. But the movie itself infuses some new blood into the old franchise, with a frisky pace and a pair of sturdy villains. Maud Adams–who’d also been in the Bond outing The Man with the Golden Gun–plays the improbably named Octopussy, while old smoothie Louis Jourdan is her crafty partner in crime. Two Bond films were actually released in 1983 within a few months of each other, as Octopussy was followed by Sean Connery’s comeback in Never Say Never Again. The success of both pictures proved that there was still plenty of mileage left in the old license to kill, though Moore had one more workout–A View to a Kill–before hanging it up. And that title? The franchise had already used up the titles to Ian Fleming’s novels, so Octopussy was taken from a lesser-known Fleming short story. — Robert Horton

Tomorrow Never Dies: Pierce Brosnan returns for his second stint as James Bond (after GoldenEye), and he’s doing it in high style with an invigorating cast of costars. It’s only appropriate that a Bond film from 1997 would find Agent 007 pitted against a media mogul (Jonathan Pryce) who’s going to start a global war (beginning with stolen nuclear missiles aimed at China) to create attention-grabbing headlines for his latest multimedia news channel. It’s the information age run amok, and Bond must team up with a lovely and lethal agent from the Chinese External Security Force (played by Honk Kong action star Michelle Yeoh) to foil the madman’s plot of global domination. Luckily for Bond, the villain’s wife (Teri Hatcher) is one of his former lovers and 007 finds ample opportunity to exploit the connection. Armed with the usual array of gadgets (including a remote-controlled BMW), Brosnan settles into his role with acceptable flair, and the dynamic Yeoh provides a perfect balance to the sexism that once threatened to turn Bond into a politically incorrect anachronism. He’s still Bond, to be sure, but he’s saving the world with a bit more sophisticated finesse. —Jeff Shannon

Moonraker: This was the first James Bond adventure produced after the success of Star Wars, so it jumped on the sci-fi bandwagon by combining the suave appeal of Agent 007 (once again played by Roger Moore) with enough high-tech hardware and special effects to make Luke Skywalker want to join Her Majesty’s Secret Service. This time Bond is up against a criminal industrialist named Drax (Michel Lonsdale) who wants to control the world from his orbiting space station. Bond thwarts this maniacal Neo-Hitler’s scheme with the help of a beautiful, sleek-figured scientist (played by Lois Chiles with all the vitality of a department-store mannequin). Despite Moore’s passive performance (which Pauline Kael described as “like an office manager who is turning into dead wood but hanging on to collect his pension”), Moonraker had no problem attracting an appreciative audience, and there are even a few renegade Bond-philes who consider it one of their favorites. —Sean Axmaker

Product Features

  • James Bond Ultimate

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Cracking the SAT Premium Edition with 8 Practice Tests, 2020: The All-in-One Solution for Your Highest Possible Score (College Test Preparation)


THE ALL-IN-ONE SOLUTION FOR YOUR HIGHEST POSSIBLE SCOREincluding 8 full-length practice tests for realistic prep, content reviews for all test sections, techniques for scoring success, and access to premium online extras.

Everything You Need to Know to Help Achieve a High Score.
· Comprehensive subject review for every section of the exam
· Valuable practice with complex reading comprehension passages and higher-level math problems
· Hands-on experience with all question types (multi-step problems, passage-based grammar questions, and more)

Practice Your Way to Perfection.
· 8 full-length practice tests (4 in the book, 4 online) with detailed answer explanations
· Drills for each test section—Reading, Writing and Language, and Math—plus writing exercises to help prepare for the Essay
· In-depth online score reports for all practice tests to help analyze and track your progress

Techniques That Actually Work.

· Powerful tactics to help you avoid traps and beat the SAT
· Pacing tips to help you maximize your time
· Detailed examples of how to employ each strategy to your advantage

Includes Access to Premium Online Exclusives:
· Videos to teach you SAT test-taking strategies and commonly-tested topics
· Access to college and university rankings, college admissions advice, and financial aid tips
· Multi-week study guides
· Special “SAT Insider” section packed with helpful info on picking your perfect school and writing essays that stand out

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Official SAT Study Guide 2020 Edition


Review every skill and question type needed for SAT success – now with eight total practice tests.

The 2018 edition of The Official SAT Study Guide doubles the number of official SAT(R) practice tests to eight – all of them created by the test maker. As part of the College Board’s commitment to transparency, all practice tests are available on the College Board’s website, but The Official SAT Study Guide is the only place to find them in print along with over 250 pages of additional instruction, guidance, and test information.

With updated guidance and practice problems that reflect the most recent information, this new edition takes the best-selling SAT guide and makes it even more relevant and useful. Be ready for the SAT with strategies and up-to-date information straight from the exam writers.

The Official SAT Study Guide will help students get ready for the SAT with:
– 8 official SAT practice tests, written in the exact same process and by the same team of authors as the actual exam
– detailed descriptions of the math and evidenced based reading and writing sections
– targeted practice questions for each SAT question type
– guidance on the new optional essay, including practice essay questions with sample responses
– seamless integration with Official SAT Practice on Khan Academy.Age range: Teen

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Halloween II (30th Anniversary Edition) [Blu-ray]


Picking up precisely where its predecessor left off, Halloween II follows the same ill-fated characters as they encounter the knife-wielding maniac they left for dead in the first Halloween. It seems the inhuman Michael Myers is still very much alive and out for more revenge as he stalks the deserted halls of the hospital where his sister (Jamie Lee Curtis) lays waiting. As he gets closer and closer to his terrified target, Dr. Loomis (Donald Pleasence) discovers the chilling mystery behind the crazed psychopath’s savage actions. Written by horror masters John Carpenter (The Thing) and Debra Hill (Escape from New York), Halloween II is a spine-tingling dark ride into the scariest night of the year.

Product Features

  • Halloween II

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Golden (Deluxe Edition)


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Barbie 2001 Collector Edition Fifth in Series – Hollywood Movie Star Collection


It’s a wrap! The filming of her latest movie is over and Barbie doll and the cast are ready to party. Always, adding extraordinary beauty and charm to any celebration, Barbie remains true to her glamourous movie-star image in her red charmeuse gown with matching red belt and golden buckle. Red gloves and a red marabou shrug embellished with golden threads further enhance the romantic appeal of her totally gorgeous look. Elegant gold-tone heels tell us she’s ready to dance the night away until work on her next picture begins.

Product Features

  • Includes : Barbie in Hollywood Cast Party Doll with Red Charmeuse Gown, Jewelry, Marabou Shrug, Shoes, Doll Stand and Certificate of Authenticity
  • Doll measured approximately 12 inch in height
  • Produced in year 2001
  • For age 14 and up

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Alfred’s Group Piano for Adults Student Book 1 (Second Edition): An Innovative Method Enhanced With Audio and Midi Files for Practice and Performance (Alfred’s Group Piano for Adults)


The Second Edition of Alfred’s Group Piano for Adults Book 1, includes updates inspired by numerous recommendations from group piano teachers and students. This book includes a CD-ROM containing both Audio and General MIDI Files of the 500+ accompaniments included in the text, each with an interesting and engaging arrangement coupled with the piano part. Designed for collegiate non-keyboard music majors with little or no keyboard experience, the easy-to-use text contains 26 units, each intended to be covered in one week, thus fulfilling two semesters or three quarters of study. Theory, technique, sight-reading, repertoire, harmonization, improvisation, and ensemble activities are taught thoroughly and consistently throughout the text. The comb binding creates a lay-flat book that is perfect for study and performance. Book 1 is 360 pages.

Selected sight-reading examples from this book are available in the Piano Maestro app that’s downloadable at Piano Maestro. Learn more about JoyTunes, the maker of Piano Maestro at JoyTunes.

Product Features

  • Alfred’s Group Piano for Adults Student Book 1 (2nd Edition) Book 1 with CD-ROM
  • The Second Edition of Alfred’s Group Piano for Adults, Book 1, includes updates inspired by numerous recommendations from group piano teachers and students
  • This book includes a CD-ROM containing both Audio and General MIDI Files of the 500+ accompaniments included in the text, each with an interesting and engaging arrangement coupled with the piano part
  • Designed for collegiate non-keyboard music majors with little or no keyboard experience, the easy-to-use text contains 26 units, each intended to be covered in one week, thus fulfilling two semesters or three quarters of study
  • Theory, technique, sight-reading, repertoire, harmonization, improvisation and ensemble activities are taught thoroughly and consistently throughout the text

For MORE INFORMATION please click here!

Endless Games The Newlywed Game Second Edition


“The Classic Game of Love And Laughter!” It’s couple versus couple in this home version of the eternally entertaining game show where you’ll discover how much you really know, or don’t know about your significant other! Now with over 600 Questions!

Product Features

  • The Classic Game of Love And Laughter
  • It’s couple versus couple in this home version of the eternally entertaining game show where you’ll discover how much you really know, or don’t know about your significant other
  • Now with over 600 Questions.
  • 2 to 4 couples
  • Ages adult

For MORE INFORMATION please click here!

James Bond Ultimate Edition – Vol. 3 (GoldenEye / Live and Let Die / For Your Eyes Only / From Russia With Love / On Her Majesty’s Secret Service)


*From Russia With Love Disc #1: -Movie with DTS 5.1 Surround and original mono/stereo -Language selections -Audio commentary by director Terence Young and cast and crew

Disc #2: -DECLASSIFIED: MI6 VAULT Ian Fleming: The CBC Interview -Ian Fleming & Raymond Chandler -Ian Fleming on Desert Island Discs -Animated Storyboard Sequence -007 MISSION CONTROL Interactive Guide Into the World of From Russia With Love -THE COMPLETE SPECIAL FEATURES LIBRARY: MISSION DOSSIER -Inside From Russia With Love -Harry Saltzman: Showman -MINISTRY OF PROPAGANDA Original Trailers, TV Spots, Photo Gallery & Radio Communications

*For Your Eyes Only Disc #1: -Movie with DTS 5.1 Surround and original mono/stereo -Newly Recorded Audio Commentary Featuring Sir Roger Moore -Language selections -Audio Commentary Featuring John Glen and Actors -Audio Commentary Featuring Michael G Wilson and Crew

Disc #2 -Newly Recorded Audio Commentary Featuring Sir Roger Moore -DECLASSIFIED: MI6 VAULT Deleted Scenes & Expanded Angles -Bond in Greece Bond in Cortina -Neptune’s Journey -007 MISSION CONTROL Interactive Guide Into the World of For Your Eyes Only -THE COMPLETE SPECIAL FEATURES LIBRARY: MISSION DOSSIER -Inside For Your Eyes Only -Animated Storyboard Sequences -Sheena Easton ‘For Your Eyes Only’ Music Video -MINISTRY OF PROPAGANDA Original Trailers, TV Spots, Photo Gallery & Radio Communications

*On Her Majesty’s Secret Service Disc #1: -Movie with DTS 5.1 Surround and original mono/stereo -Language selections -Audio Commentary Featuring Director Peter Hunt and Members of the Cast and Crew

Disc #2: -DECLASSIFIED: MI6 VAULT Casting On Her Majesty’s Secret Service -Press Day in Portugal -George Lazenby: In His Own Words -Shot on Ice – Original 1969 Ford Promo -Film Swiss Movement – Original 1969 Featurette 007 -007 MISSION CONTROL Interactive Guide Into the World of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service -THE COMPLETE SPECIAL FEATURES LIBRARY: MISSION DOSSIER -Inside On Her Majesty’s Secret Service -Inside Q’s Lab -Above It All – Original 1969 Featurette

*Live And Let Die Disc #1: -Movie with DTS 5.1 Surround and original mono/stereo -Newly Recorded Audio Commentary Featuring Sir Roger Moore -Language selections -Audio commentary by director Guy Hamilton and Tom Mankiewicz and cast and crew

Disc #2: -DECLASSIFIED: MI6 VAULT Bond 1973: The Lost Documentary -Roger Moore as James Bond, Circa 1964 -Live and Let Die Conceptual Art -007 MISSION CONTROL Interactive Guide Into the World of Live and Let Die -THE COMPLETE SPECIAL FEATURES LIBRARY: MISSION DOSSIER -Inside Live and Let Die -On Set With Roger Moore

*GoldenEye Disc #1: -Movie with DTS 5.1 Surround and original stereo -Language selections -Audio Commentary Featuring Martin Campbell and Michael G. Wilson

Disc #2: -DECLASSIFIED: MI6 VAULT Deleted Scenes With Introductions by -Director Martin Campbell -Directing Bond: The Martin Chronicles -Building a Better Bond: Pre-Production Featurette -The Return of Bond – The Start of Production Press Event -Driven to Bond: Remy Julienne -Anatomy of a Stunt: Tank Versus Perrier -Making it in Small Pictures: Derek Meddings -On Location With Peter Lamont -GoldenEye: The Secret Files -Pre-Title Storyboard Sequence With Director Martin Campbell -007 MISSION CONTROL Interactive Guide Into the World of GoldenEye -THE COMPLETE SPECIAL FEATURES LIBRARY: MISSION DOSSIER -The World of 007 – Original 1995 Television Special Hosted by Elizabeth Hurley -The GoldenEye Video Journal Promotional Featurette -Tina Turner ‘GoldenEye’ Music Video -MINISTRY OF PROPAGANDA Original Trailers, TV Spots, Photo Gallery & Radio Communications Goldeneye: The 18th James Bond adventure was a runaway box-office success when released in 1995, thanks to the arrival of Pierce Brosnan as the fifth actor (following the departure of Timothy Dalton) to play the suave, danger-loving Agent 007. This James Bond is a bit more vulnerable and psychologically complex–and just a shade more politically correct–but he’s still a formally attired playboy at heart, with a lovely Russian beauty (Izabella Scorupco) as his sexy ally against a cadre of renegade Russians bent on–what else?–global domination. There’s also a seductive villainous with the suggestive name of Xenia Onatopp (Famke Janssen), and the great actress Judi Dench makes her first appearance as Bond’s superior, M, who wisecracks about 007’s “dinosaur” status as a globetrotting sexist. All in all, this action-packed Bond adventure provided a much-needed boost the long-running movie series, revitalizing the 007 franchise for the turn of the millennium. —Jeff Shannon

Live and Let Die: Roger Moore was introduced as James Bond in this 1973 action movie featuring secret agent 007. More self-consciously suave and formal than predecessor Sean Connery, he immediately reestablished Bond as an uncomplicated and wooden fellow for the feel-good ’70s. This film also marks a deviation from the more character-driven stories of the Connery years, a deliberate shift to plastic action (multiple chases, bravura stunts) that made the franchise more of a comic book or machine. If that’s not depressing enough, there’s even a good British director on board, Guy Hamilton (Force 10 from Navarone). The story finds Bond taking on an international drug dealer (Yaphet Kotto), and while that may be superficially relevant, it isn’t exactly the same as fighting supervillains on the order of Goldfinger. —Tom Keogh

For Your Eyes Only: After a ship sunk off the coast of Albania, the world’s superpowers begin a feverish search for its valuable lost cargo: the powerful ATAC system, which will give its bearer unlimited control over Polaris nuclear submarines. As Bond joins the search, he suspects the suave Kristatos (Julian Glover) of seizing the device. The competition between nations grows more deadly by the moment, but Bond finds an ally in the beautiful Melina Havelock (Caroline Bouquet), who blames Kristatos for the death of her parents. The non-stop action includes automobile chases, thrilling underwater battles, and even a breathtaking tour over razor-sharp coral reefs. But all of this is merely a prelude to 007’s cliffhanging assault of a magnificent mountaintop fortress. — Robert Lynch

From Russia with Love: Directed with consummate skill by Terence Young, the second James Bond spy thriller is considered by many fans to be the best of them all. Certainly Sean Connery was never better as the dashing Agent 007, whose latest mission takes him to Istanbul to retrieve a top-secret Russian decoding machine. His efforts are thwarted when he gets romantically distracted by a sexy Russian double agent (Daniela Bianchi), and is tracked by a lovely assassin (Lotte Lenya) with switchblade shoes, and by a crazed killer (Robert Shaw), who clashes with Bond during the film’s dazzling climax aboard the Orient Express. From Russia with Love is classic James Bond, before the gadgets, pyrotechnics, and Roger Moore steered the movies away from the more realistic tone of the books by Ian Fleming. —Jeff Shannon

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service: Australian model George Lazenby took up the mantle of the world’s most suave secret agent when Sean Connery retired as James Bond (although Connery returned in Diamonds Are Forever before leaving the role to Roger Moore); Lazenby’s subsequent career fizzled, yet this one-hit wonder is responsible for one of the best Bond films of all time. In On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 007 leaves the Service to privately pursue his SPECTRE nemesis Blofeld (played this time by Telly Savalas), whose latest master plan involves a threat to the world’s crops by agricultural sterilization. Bond teams up with suave international crime lord Draco (Gabriele Ferzetti) and falls in love with–and marries–his elegant daughter, Tracy (Diana Rigg). Bond goes monogamous? Not at first; after all he has Blofeld’s harem to seduce. Lazenby hasn’t the intensity of Connery but he has fun with his quips and even lampoons the Bond image in a playful pre-credits sequence, and Rigg, fresh from playing sexy Emma Peel in The Avengers, matches 007 in every way. Former editor Peter Hunt makes a strong directorial debut, deftly handling the elaborate action sequences with a kinetic finesse. Though not a hit on its original release, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service has become a fan favorite and the closest the series has come to capturing the spirit of Ian Fleming’s books. —Sean Axmaker

Beyond James Bond Ultimate Collection – Vol. 3


James Bond Ultimate Collection – Vol. 1

James Bond Ultimate Edition – Vol. 2

James Bond Ultimate Edition – Vol. 4

Stills from James Bond Ultimate Collection – Vol. 3 (click for larger image)

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UNCF Tribute To Patti Labelle LIMITED EDITION DVD


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